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Cressida, Isabella & Helena: Three Problematic Heroines

Cressida, Isabella & Helena: Three Problematic Heroines

Shakespeare, Machiavellian Prudence and Integrity by David Hurley A Presentation for the Shakespeare & Modern Authors Society 県立広島大学 September 2015   My paper will look at how prudential considerations place pressure upon the apparent integrity of various characters and the responsive strategies which those characters – and Shakespeare in his representation of them – adopt in adapting to, or resisting, or yielding to the circumstances which confront them. For the purposes of this paper I will focus mainly on the three…

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Shakespearean Characters With The Most To Say…

Shakespearean Characters With The Most To Say…

Here’s a good question to slip into a pub quiz or to try out on your friends who think they are Shakespeare buffs… Which Shakespearean character is given the most lines in any single play? Which character has the second most lines to say, the third most, the fourth most? Let’s be clear that I do NOT mean the sum total of lines for any character across several plays, such as Falstaff for example, who appears in several different plays,…

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Machiavelli And His Influence On Shakespeare

Machiavelli And His Influence On Shakespeare

This post is based on a lecture given by David Hurley to Sekkai O Miru Kai, Hiroshima, 2009. Who Was Machiavelli? Niccolo Machiavelli was born in Renaissance Florence on 3rd May 1469. The Renaissance was a time of renewed classical learning, of discovered continents and rediscovered manuscripts, progress in the arts and sciences, and the expansion of horizons literally and metaphorically. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Machiavelli is a good example of a Renaissance Man, a man of many talents; in…

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Montaigne Used Pyrrhonian Scepticism To Undermine Ficino’s Doctrine Of Melancholic Inspiration

Montaigne Used Pyrrhonian Scepticism To Undermine Ficino’s Doctrine Of Melancholic Inspiration

“Madness, good, bad, or merely medical, underlies a great deal of Renaissance thought, worship, morals, literature and humour… Aristotle believed that many madmen, and all geniuses, were melancholic, an assertion he explained with the help of Plato: he took the inspiration of the true genius to be one of the good ‘manias’ which Socrates praised in the Phaedrus – a form of extatic madness closely allied to the raptures experienced by seers, prophets, poets and lovers.” – M. A. Screech,…

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