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Tag: Patrick Forse

On the Late Proceedings in France

On the Late Proceedings in France

“I will not give you reason to imagine, that I think my sentiments of such value as to wish myself to be solicited about them. They are of too little consequence to be very anxiously either communicated or withheld.” “He said: a cornered dish without corners; what sort of a cornered dish is that?” “Fake” has become itself a little bit, Now that every fakir is using it, Well, let’s face it, fake; What is truth when fake Flakes into…

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Fret Not My Friends For Me If I Withdraw…

Fret Not My Friends For Me If I Withdraw…

Fret not my friends for me if I withdraw, Or take less pleasure in your company And am not found where once I used to be; Nor wonder that I am not as before. For true it seems that I am changed, not you, You are ever as you were, or better; Yet I would not be to time a debtor, Or never change with time when change is due. Time’s slaves in staying never stay the times, In ever…

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A Sonnet In Lamentation Of A Dead Sparrow, After Catullus

A Sonnet In Lamentation Of A Dead Sparrow, After Catullus

Here is a loose translation of Catullus iii, Lament for Lesbia’s Pet Sparrow, in the form of a sonnet, submitted by guest blogger Patrick Leighton Forse. Catullus‘ poem has 18 lines, but a sonnet has only 14 lines, so some compression has obviously been necessary. The sonnet retains the three quatrains and final couplet, typical of a Shakespearean sonnet, but each quatrain has a distinct rhyme scheme, moving  from ABBA to CCDD to EFEF before returning to form with the…

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Quid ad me? A Poem Addressed to (Daphne in) a Laurel Tree, to Aphrodite, to Beauty & Immortality.

Quid ad me? A Poem Addressed to (Daphne in) a Laurel Tree, to Aphrodite, to Beauty & Immortality.

What is it to me oh laurel tree if, before the gaze of the fishermen who fish the Aegean sea it was your bark that bit into the body of Peneus’ lovely daughter, of naked Daphne as she ran through Thessaly as if to flee from the glory of God according to the story? Was it, I wonder, was it at all gory, the aftermath of the story in which Apollo chased chaste Daphne until she was turned into a…

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